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Richmond Railroad Museum

Hull Street Station

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Richmond has been served by multiple railroads since the 1830's. The five lines fanning out from the city in 1861 were a major reason for choosing Richmond as the capital of the Confederacy. With rail consolidation after the war, the names changed but for much of the 20th. century the city still hosted six major lines. The corporate headquarters of the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad and the CSX were located in the city.

Richmond Railroad Museum

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rrm_state The Old Dominion Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society opened the restored historic Southern Railway Station in Richmond in 2011 as the new home of the Richmond Railroad Museum. The facility is the century-old former Southern Railway Hull Street passenger and freight station. The museum includes a stationmaster's office, freight room where the chapter's artifacts and exhibits are displayed, gift shop, and a gallery that includes Richmond's largest HO scale model railroad. Rolling stock on the grounds includes a steam saddle locomotive, baggage car, boxcar, and a caboose. The museum focuses on railroads which served central Virginia, and their impact on Richmond and its citizens. That chapter also maintains a railroad yard with numerous equipment west of Richmond, along the former Southern Railway Richmond secondary. Public excursions are conducted in cooperation with the Buckingham Branch Railroad.

Click to see the Richmond Railroad Museum plotted on a Google Maps page
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Richmond, Va / Dec 2017 / RWH

Rolling Stock

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Built by American Car and Foundry in 1937 and originally numbered 185 (one of six, 180-185; #1632). Converted and renumbered to Tool Car 230 in 1969. Donated by Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac in March 1984. Renovated and currently used at Richmond Railroad Museum. Renumbered to 185.

Old Dominion NRHS

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The Seaboard System was a Class 1 Railroad created by merging the railroads of the Family Lines System. Seaboard System was formed in 1983, in order to facilitate the eventual merger with CSX which occurred in July of 1986. Three caboose types were used by Seaboard System, including the M5, M6 and M7. SBD 21019 is a type M5. Production of the M5 began in 1964 and continued until 1969. They were built by converting old 36 foot boxcars (Pullman Standard built in 1942) numbered 0600-01039. This caboose designated as #1019, was built in 1969 at the West Jacksonville ACL shops in Jacksonville, Florida. While earlier cabooses of this type were painted orange, this one was originally gray and bore the Family Lines insignia as it appears today. The original number 01019 was changed to 21019 when Family Lines merged with CSX.

Old Dominion NRHS

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Monochrome Morning

Richmond, Va / Dec 2017 / RWH

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Hull Street Hues

Richmond, Va / Dec 2017 / RWH

Links / Sources

This page was updated on 2018-01-28